Wednesday, September 18, 2019

1000 Steps Beach


Whenever you check out any of the sites we tell you about at the OC You Don’t See, we want to stress the importance of taking good care to be safe.  Today’s adventure is one of those that we recommend you do some homework before you go and be certain you visit when tides are low.

One of the lesser known beaches in Laguna Beach is 1000 Steps Beach, and the local residents like it like that. In spite of their best efforts to keep it quiet, though, 1000 Steps has become a popular adventure for many visitors.

Park around 9th street in South Laguna near PCH, and head toward the beach. There is a very long set of stairs (about 200 steps) that will take you down to the beach. Why go?  First of all, the beach is beautiful and less populated simply because it isn’t the easiest place to get to. Second, there are some very interesting natural features, like caves, steep bluffs, and tidepools. Third, there are the concrete saltwater pools.

During the summer season you will find a lifeguard on duty along with other beach amenities, like a restroom and showers. But in order to access some of the unique features, you will need to ignore some signs telling you no trespassing and find your way through a cave.  The lifeguards often help but be certain to wear decent shoes. The cave is why you need to check tides, because once high tide comes in, you can find yourself in serious danger. When lifeguards are on duty, they will close the cave during high tide.

Once through the tunnel, climb over a couple of rocky points and you will find a smaller beach, and beyond that, the concrete pools. Keep heading south.

If at all possible, visit during the week, because weekends get crowded and often rowdy.  The pools are on private property, so please respect the owner’s wishes. If caught you could be fined. But the beach area is public, and you can enjoy the view and visit the tidepools as you wish. 
Photo via Google Earth

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